The TSX Venture is Broken. Here’s How to Fix It

- April 23rd, 2013

The Investing News Network spoke with Darrin Hopkins, an investment advisor with Macquarie Capital, on how to breathe new life into the moribund TSX Venture Exchange.

The TSX Venture is Broken. Here's How to Fix ItThe TSX Venture Exchange is broken and it needs fixing, but the regulators who govern the securities exchanges and the federal government, which could push for some badly needed changes, do not seem to be aware of the problem. The Investing News Network (INN) approached venture capital industry veteran Darrin Hopkins, an investment advisor in the Calgary office of Macquarie Private Wealth, and asked his opinion about what should be done.

“I’ve been in the industry for almost 20 years, and this is the worst junior public venture market I’ve seen,” Hopkins told INN on Monday. He disagrees with observers who say the decline of the TSXV over the past year is part of a normal business cycle. “There’s been a paradigm shift in terms of risk tolerance, and I don’t think it’s just a normal cycle.”

The mood on the Venture’s trading floor and among the companies that list there is decidedly glum. As we reported two weeks ago, the TSXV, where most Canadian junior resource stocks are listed, saw a significant drop in trading volumes last year, with the number of shares changing hands falling 32.8 percent and the overall value of those trades slumping 44.5 percent.

In the last 12 months, the TSX Venture Composite Index has fallen roughly 30 percent, closing at 944 points on Monday, a level it hasn’t seen since April 2009.

While the precipitous decline in Canada’s premier marketplace for junior resource companies can partly be attributed to macroeconomic factors, such as the slowdown in China and the recent slide in commodities prices, Hopkins believes there is something more structural going on. He should know. Hopkins is chairman of the national and local advisory committee of the TSX Venture Exchange and a member of several committees set up by regulators and stock exchanges. He recently wrote to Canadian Finance Minister Jim Flaherty with his concerns about the state of the junior resource market, alarmed, according to an article in the Financial Post, about how the recycling of capital in the junior market has diminished — meaning a reduction both in the amount of capital raised and in the dollar value of shares traded. The numbers tell the story: in the first quarter of 2011, the Venture raised $3.4 billion. In Q1 2012, that was cut in half, to $1.7 billion. In the first quarter of 2013, the TSXV raised $1.1 billion and did not see one initial public offering.

Identifying the problems

One way junior resource companies, particularly oil and gas juniors, previously raised capital was by being acquired by income trusts. Income trusts offered investors consistent cash flow, but they also paid little to no tax, and for that reason, in 2006, the Conservative government eliminated them. Doing so, said Hopkins, killed a system that recycled capital among junior resource companies. Once bought out, the companies could use the capital to start up another company or invest in other ventures. “You saw that money flow into other venture capital, but once [income trusts] got dismantled it stopped happening.”

Adding to the death of the income trust, other factors have weighed heavily on the TSXV, including softening stock markets, a shift in risk tolerance and what Hopkins calls “regulation creep,” which over the last decade has ratcheted up the annual cost of listing a public company on the TSXV.

“You add all that up, so now you have a prohibitive cost of capital, few successes and a lot more failures because you can’t access capital. You have more capital leaving because nobody wants to invest in a market that’s cold,” he said.

Finding solutions

1. Strip down securities regulations

One example of regulation creep that Hopkins finds particularly galling is the requirement for juniors to create a 200- to 300-page information circular that goes out to investors. The reports cost up to $200,000 in accounting and legal resources to produce, but are so complex and detailed that most investors do not read them. “In my mind, that has to be stripped down completely,” Hopkins said. “The reports need to disclose what the average investor wants to know and it’s simple to understand.”

He added that it seems patently unfair that the cost of meeting securities regulations is the same for all companies, regardless of whether the company has a $4-billion or a $5-million market capitalization.

“You can’t lay the costs off on a junior like you can on a large company, and so it makes the cost of capital prohibitively expensive. Most of these junior companies are spending a good proportion of their cash flow into complying with securities regulations as opposed to creating value.”

2. Broaden access to capital

The most common way for a publicly traded company on the TSX Venture Exchange to raise money is through a private placement. Private placements, however, are only available to accredited investors, which include institutional investors and high-net-worth individuals who earn over $200,000 a year and who typically have more than $1 million in assets. Only 2 percent of Canadians currently qualify as accredited investors, meaning that 98 percent of Canadians are excluded from participating in private placements, according to Hopkins. His solution? Broaden access to capital. Hopkins believes there is no need to restrict participation in private placements to accredited investors as the companies have already been vetted and must disclose on a quarterly and annual basis. What’s more, the current restrictions that prevent non-accredited investors from participating in the placements are designed to protect investors from catastrophic loss; however, once an investor becomes accredited, there is no limit on the actual investment. Thus, he suggested that a new “investor-lite” category be created to allow “average Canadians” — those earning $40,000 to $50,000 a year — to invest a to-be-determined maximum amount in private placements.

3. Market the best companies outside Canada

TMX Group (TSX:X), the parent company of the TSX and the TSX Venture, in February announced the TSX Venture 50, a list of the top-ranked companies on the exchange based on a set of criteria. The list was posted on the TMX Group website and appeared in Canadian Business magazine. Hopkins said the way the TMX Group markets the Venture is backwards. Instead of trying to find companies outside Canada to list on the exchange, the TMX should be taking the best companies “on the road” to investor shows in financial capitals like Hong Kong, New York and London to market the best companies on the exchange to investors. “That will draw capital into the public venture capital markets in Canada, and that’s what they need.”

4. Set up a US venture market

Along with the accredited investor restriction, Venture-listed companies are further hampered by the fact that Americans who want to trade junior resource stocks are faced with restrictions. Hopkins said the rules should be loosened to allow more Americans to trade on the TSXV, but what could really boost volumes and share prices is if a venture exchange could open in the United States. Such an exchange could go beyond the current Over the Counter (OTC) market and could be co-branded with the TSXV so that junior resource companies have dual listings in both Canada and the United States.

“This is the opportune time to go to the US regulators and say, ‘we’ve got a solution for you.’ We’ve got a public venture exchange in Canada. It’s been around 100 years. It’s got a great reputation, we’ve got rules, procedures, policies, management,” said Hopkins. “You’d be opening up this market to such a broad audience and just on a daily trading basis it would make a significant difference to the exchange up here.”

Hopkins has some excellent ideas on how to reform the Venture, but when asked how likely it is that his ideas will be accepted, he was not optimistic. He said companies like Macquarie aren’t doing many small-cap financings and the independent brokerage houses are consolidating, meaning that there are fewer firms and fewer brokers out there raising capital for juniors. He did say, however, that the federal government could play a strong role in facilitating changes in securities regulations in an effort to inject more capital into the Venture market. Reviewing the capital gains exemptions could be another way to attract more investors. Importantly, he said that the decision makers are “totally and completely unaware” of the problem, hence the need to create awareness.

Thankfully, TMX Group appears to be listening. The company is hosting town hall meeting discussions in Vancouver and Calgary this week to brainstorm ideas on how to breathe new life into the Venture. Darrin Hopkins is a panelist at the Calgary event.

 

Securities Disclosure: I, Andrew Topf, do not hold equity interests in any of the companies mentioned in this article.

Related reading: 

TSX Venture Boss Downplays Junior Mining Woes

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4 responses to “The TSX Venture is Broken. Here’s How to Fix It

  1. Increasing share value in markets comes from the earnings that companies make, but what has happened is that high frequency trading (HFT) algorithms microsecond by microsecond all day long pull all the value out. Real human traders are trading
    against computers. HFT tout they provided liquidity but that liquidity is risk free or low risk relative to other monies invested. We saw that yesterday. High frequency trading systems pulled from the market in the blink of an eye at a sense of danger leaving less responsive risk money holding the bag. A fake twitter message revealed that yesterday when there was a mini crash on stock exchanges. That is why people do not want to put up risk money any longer on the venture exchange. People have learned the system is rigged and are getting out.

    Here is a news release on what happened yesterday:

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/twitter-trading-influence-laid-bare-by-fake-tweet-2013-04-23?dist=tcountdown

    Twitter trading influence laid bare by fake tweet

    High-frequency trading compounds damage, traders say

    24 Comments

    By Wallace Witkowski, MarketWatch , Sital S. Patel

    SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — It was the tweet heard around the
    markets, and for about four minutes it sent everything crashing.

    Shortly after 1 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday, a breaking-news tweet surfaced on the Associated Press’s main account, @AP, reporting that two explosions had gone off at the White House and that U.S. President Barack Obama had been injured.

    In the blink of an eye, the Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA +1.05% , the S&P 500 Index SPX +1.04% , the Nasdaq Composite Index COMP +1.11% , and crude oil CLM3 +0.53% all dropped 1%. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note 10_YEAR +0.06% fell 4 basis points and the CBOE Volatility Index VIX -6.32%
    , the so-called fear index, spiked 10%. Markets then raced back to
    their pre-tweet levels roughly four minutes later after the account was
    suspended and it was revealed that the tweet was a hoax.

    The Associated Press said its main Twitter account had been compromised and that the attack had been preceded by a phishing attempt on AP’s corporate network.

    And, of course, the Twittersphere was all atwitter about the breach. The company told MarketWatch it had no comment on the @AP hack.

    But the deep, sudden impact of the tweet—the Dow went from a nearly 140 point-gain to a 13-point drop in a time span reminiscent of the May 2010 “flash crash”—confirmed that the microblogging site has evolved into an influential yet problematic tool for traders, particularly those that use computer trading programs.

    “In many respects, Twitter is the latest news wire of Wall Street. Investors have come to
    rely on the social medium for minute-by-minute news and opinion,” Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at BMO Private Bank, said in emailed comments. “False reports due to the account hacking undermine Twitter’s credibility is some respects. We have to recognize Twitter for what it is, a social media site, and an unfiltered news source.”

    NYSE floor trader Benedict Willis said the reaction said much about the role of high-frequency trading in today’s market.

    “It is however a commentary on high frequency trading’s ability to demonstrate they are not liquidity providers, and that this market is vulnerable to a computer generated turbulence,” Willis said in emailed comments. “There were no bids to hit, that makes you question how many real buyers, if any, were represented.”

    Social media is becoming a more legitimate source for information now that the SEC has given companies explicit permission to use sites such as Twitter, Facebook Inc. FB +0.04% and LinkedIn Corp. LNKD +5.02% to make announcements.

    In some ways, that has made social media a double-edged sword when those accounts are hacked. Hackers have not only tried to break into computers at Apple Inc. AAPL +1.87% and Facebook, they’ve broken into Twitter pages maintained by Burger King and Chrysler’s Jeep brand. Even the BBC’s weather service Twitter account has been hacked.

    As with any new information technology used by markets, managers and traders need to realize false market-moving news is always a risk that needs to be dealt with, especially in the volatile world of high-frequency trading, according to Philip Pearlman, executive editor at StockTwits a social-media site focused on stocks.

    Stocks resume rally after fake tweet

    U.S. stocks rose on Tuesday, recouping after an erroneous tweet pushed equities down 1% in seconds. Kaitlyn Kiernan breaks down the big moves of the day on The News Hub.

    Plus, Pearlman added, the Dow plunge only lasted a few minutes before the index recovered to near its earlier levels. It ended up 152 points, near its highs of the day.

    “In a way, that’s a really healthy thing: The dissemination that it was a hoax went out just as quickly, and the latency was very, very brief,” Pearlman said. “People are not focusing on the resiliency of the market and the self-corrective aspects of social media.”

    Indeed, the action illustrated how investors, at least those with a short-term horizon, are prone to knee-jerk reactions.

    “I think it’s a sad comment of trading these days where a tweet, a simple tweet, can have that sort of an impact when not verified by other sources,” said David Ader at CRT Capital Group in emailed comments. Ader said the reaction shows how jittery trading is these days and how headline news is having greater influence than fundamentals.

    Sal Arnuk, co-owner and partner at Themis Trading, said Tuesday’s events demonstrate the extent to which Twitter is used by high-frequency traders in today’s fast paced marketplace.

    “Everyone realizes that this [Twitter] is the Wild West in terms of news content delivery and consumption nowadays,” he said. “The real issue is that we all have to realize how quickly the markets can react because of the automated nature of the markets to information, good or bad.”

    He added that the SEC will have a difficult time monitoring and catching individuals who hack tweets and move markets, because of the global nature of the markets. The SEC declined to comment on whether or not it will be investigating the market impact of the trade.

    “I imagine there will be additional trading safeguards that will need to be enacted, as there were following the insider-trading scandals,” said Peter Sorrentino, senior portfolio manager at Huntington Asset Advisors, in emailed comments.

    “It could also be an emerging form of terrorism, one based upon disrupting financial
    institutions along with destroying public faith in those institutions,” Sorrentino said.

    “It isn’t a prank and it isn’t funny,” said Edward Skyler, executive vice president for global public affairs at Citi, in emailed comments. “I imagine that if the Secret Service can identify these clowns, they won’t be laughing either.”

    But really, it does ultimately boil down to confirming any market-moving information with other sources before acting, said Garrett Nenner, managing director at Rosenblatt Securities, in emailed comments.

    “We’ve seen issues like this occur in the past more than once,” he said. “Relying on a single source of information is dangerous.”

    The market gyrations highlight how a high-frequency trading algorithm can “read” a tweet, and press the sell button in a microsecond, which is what likely happened with the fake tweet about events at the White House.

    “The algorithm or processor put those words together and then related it to the U.S. markets as a national event that would negatively affect all stocks,” Nenner said.

    Wallace Witkowski is a MarketWatch news editor in San Francisco. Follow him on Twitter @wmwitkowski. Sital Patel covers Wall Street and the financial services industry from New York. You can follow her on Twitter at @Sital. Ron Orol in Washington
    D.C. and Saumya Vaishampayan in New York contributed to this report.

  2. Increasing share value in markets comes from the earnings that companies make, but what has happened is that high frequency trading (HFT) algorithms microsecond by microsecond all day long pull all the value out. Real human traders are trading
    against computers. HFT tout they provided liquidity but that liquidity is risk free or low risk relative to other monies invested. We saw that yesterday. High frequency trading systems pulled from the market in the blink of an eye at a sense of danger leaving less responsive risk money holding the bag. A fake twitter message revealed that yesterday when there was a mini crash on stock exchanges. That is why people do not want to put up risk money any longer on the venture exchange. People have learned the system is rigged and are getting out.

    Here is a news release on what happened yesterday:

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/twitter-trading-influence-laid-bare-by-fake-tweet-2013-04-23?dist=tcountdown

    Twitter trading influence laid bare by fake tweet

    High-frequency trading compounds damage, traders say

    24 Comments

    By Wallace Witkowski, MarketWatch , Sital S. Patel

    SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — It was the tweet heard around the
    markets, and for about four minutes it sent everything crashing.

    Shortly after 1 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday, a breaking-news tweet surfaced on the Associated Press’s main account, @AP, reporting that two explosions had gone off at the White House and that U.S. President Barack Obama had been injured.

    In the blink of an eye, the Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA +1.05% , the S&P 500 Index SPX +1.04% , the Nasdaq Composite Index COMP +1.11% , and crude oil CLM3 +0.53% all dropped 1%. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note 10_YEAR +0.06% fell 4 basis points and the CBOE Volatility Index VIX -6.32%
    , the so-called fear index, spiked 10%. Markets then raced back to
    their pre-tweet levels roughly four minutes later after the account was
    suspended and it was revealed that the tweet was a hoax.

    The Associated Press said its main Twitter account had been compromised and that the attack had been preceded by a phishing attempt on AP’s corporate network.

    And, of course, the Twittersphere was all atwitter about the breach. The company told MarketWatch it had no comment on the @AP hack.

    But the deep, sudden impact of the tweet—the Dow went from a nearly 140 point-gain to a 13-point drop in a time span reminiscent of the May 2010 “flash crash”—confirmed that the microblogging site has evolved into an influential yet problematic tool for traders, particularly those that use computer trading programs.

    “In many respects, Twitter is the latest news wire of Wall Street. Investors have come to
    rely on the social medium for minute-by-minute news and opinion,” Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at BMO Private Bank, said in emailed comments. “False reports due to the account hacking undermine Twitter’s credibility is some respects. We have to recognize Twitter for what it is, a social media site, and an unfiltered news source.”

    NYSE floor trader Benedict Willis said the reaction said much about the role of high-frequency trading in today’s market.

    “It is however a commentary on high frequency trading’s ability to demonstrate they are not liquidity providers, and that this market is vulnerable to a computer generated turbulence,” Willis said in emailed comments. “There were no bids to hit, that makes you question how many real buyers, if any, were represented.”

    Social media is becoming a more legitimate source for information now that the SEC has given companies explicit permission to use sites such as Twitter, Facebook Inc. FB +0.04% and LinkedIn Corp. LNKD +5.02% to make announcements.

    In some ways, that has made social media a double-edged sword when those accounts are hacked. Hackers have not only tried to break into computers at Apple Inc. AAPL +1.87% and Facebook, they’ve broken into Twitter pages maintained by Burger King and Chrysler’s Jeep brand. Even the BBC’s weather service Twitter account has been hacked.

    As with any new information technology used by markets, managers and traders need to realize false market-moving news is always a risk that needs to be dealt with, especially in the volatile world of high-frequency trading, according to Philip Pearlman, executive editor at StockTwits a social-media site focused on stocks.

    Stocks resume rally after fake tweet

    U.S. stocks rose on Tuesday, recouping after an erroneous tweet pushed equities down 1% in seconds. Kaitlyn Kiernan breaks down the big moves of the day on The News Hub.

    Plus, Pearlman added, the Dow plunge only lasted a few minutes before the index recovered to near its earlier levels. It ended up 152 points, near its highs of the day.

    “In a way, that’s a really healthy thing: The dissemination that it was a hoax went out just as quickly, and the latency was very, very brief,” Pearlman said. “People are not focusing on the resiliency of the market and the self-corrective aspects of social media.”

    Indeed, the action illustrated how investors, at least those with a short-term horizon, are prone to knee-jerk reactions.

    “I think it’s a sad comment of trading these days where a tweet, a simple tweet, can have that sort of an impact when not verified by other sources,” said David Ader at CRT Capital Group in emailed comments. Ader said the reaction shows how jittery trading is these days and how headline news is having greater influence than fundamentals.

    Sal Arnuk, co-owner and partner at Themis Trading, said Tuesday’s events demonstrate the extent to which Twitter is used by high-frequency traders in today’s fast paced marketplace.

    “Everyone realizes that this [Twitter] is the Wild West in terms of news content delivery and consumption nowadays,” he said. “The real issue is that we all have to realize how quickly the markets can react because of the automated nature of the markets to information, good or bad.”

    He added that the SEC will have a difficult time monitoring and catching individuals who hack tweets and move markets, because of the global nature of the markets. The SEC declined to comment on whether or not it will be investigating the market impact of the trade.

    “I imagine there will be additional trading safeguards that will need to be enacted, as there were following the insider-trading scandals,” said Peter Sorrentino, senior portfolio manager at Huntington Asset Advisors, in emailed comments.

    “It could also be an emerging form of terrorism, one based upon disrupting financial
    institutions along with destroying public faith in those institutions,” Sorrentino said.

    “It isn’t a prank and it isn’t funny,” said Edward Skyler, executive vice president for global public affairs at Citi, in emailed comments. “I imagine that if the Secret Service can identify these clowns, they won’t be laughing either.”

    But really, it does ultimately boil down to confirming any market-moving information with other sources before acting, said Garrett Nenner, managing director at Rosenblatt Securities, in emailed comments.

    “We’ve seen issues like this occur in the past more than once,” he said. “Relying on a single source of information is dangerous.”

    The market gyrations highlight how a high-frequency trading algorithm can “read” a tweet, and press the sell button in a microsecond, which is what likely happened with the fake tweet about events at the White House.

    “The algorithm or processor put those words together and then related it to the U.S. markets as a national event that would negatively affect all stocks,” Nenner said.

    Wallace Witkowski is a MarketWatch news editor in San Francisco. Follow him on Twitter @wmwitkowski. Sital Patel covers Wall Street and the financial services industry from New York. You can follow her on Twitter at @Sital. Ron Orol in Washington
    D.C. and Saumya Vaishampayan in New York contributed to this report.

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