Bard Begins Drilling on Lone Pine Molybdenum-Copper-Silver Project

- May 20th, 2011

Bard Ventures Ltd. (CVE:CBS,FRA:BVU) announced it has begun drilling at its Lone Pine project.

Bard Ventures Ltd. (TSXV:CBS,FRA:BVU) announced it has begun drilling at its Lone Pine project.

The press release is quoted as saying:

The drill program is planned to further evaluate exceptional drill hole results received from all three Zones on the Property, being the Alaskite Zone, the Quartz Breccia Zone and the 61 Zone.

Click here to access the full news release.

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22 responses to “Bard Begins Drilling on Lone Pine Molybdenum-Copper-Silver Project

    1. You are right – Kazakhstan is the wild card. Between them an Russia they could flood the market keeping prices low or move them lower. Look what they did to the potash industry this month. Japan has fast tracked the building of 14 coal fired plants. Not looking good for Uranium sales.

    1. You are right – Kazakhstan is the wild card. Between them an Russia they could flood the market keeping prices low or move them lower. Look what they did to the potash industry this month. Japan has fast tracked the building of 14 coal fired plants. Not looking good for Uranium sales.

  1. Its inevitable that we burn the “oil” of supernovas past. Its energy that is too easy to release and too powerful to resist. The only question is where our technology will go. A question for the physicists to answer, as always. Subcritical fusion/fission hybrids? Molten-salt reactors? Thorium? Helium-cooled fast reactors? I’ll find out.

    1. It will be an interesting future to be sure. My take is that as technology progresses, the reactors will become more efficient and far safer. This will cause public acceptance of nuclear power to grow, ergo more consumption from more generators. But as efficiency grows, demand may taper. It may cause erratic growth in the U3O8 supply industry.

      1. Bingo, Steve. Efficiency is probably the direction the tech is headed, where reactors are so efficient that they operate on their own producing power for sixty years without so much as a refuel. I agree safety is improving – digital technology’s influence has been overwhelmingly in that direction.Take for instance the dramatic reduction in highway deaths even as crash rates remained constant. That was from just using CAD software and small amounts of driver-assist technologies like traction contorl. Reactors are quickly becoming nearly robotic, able to control their own states to such a degree that human-error is becoming increasingly impossible. They are starting to look more like lifeforms than machines.

        Remember to give the reactor operators credit, however. They have
        developed such an incredible “safety culture” that they would be better off not buying into healthcare.

          1. Currently fast-spectrum neutrons are increasingly utilized in new reactor designs, rather than just slow neutrons. These fast neutrons have a tendency to upconvert U238 to U239–>Np239–>Pu239, which fissions, whereas slow neutrons tend to just consume fuel rather than produce it. Thus the important trends in reactor “nuclear combustion” is the employment of neutrons to create more and more fuel inside the fuel during normal operation, extending refueling times to decades, and decreasing human labor. Thus reprocessing of spent fuel would be a continuous thing occurring inside the reactor, rather than something occurring outside the reactor at a different site.

            As for the fuel we have already used, currently sitting in water pools on-site at reactors across the world, its destination is the trash bin. A deep-geological disposal is very straightforward technically, but when non-technical people get involved in any process things get overly complicated (politics).

            Regardless, the nuclear renaissance starts the day a carbon-tax goes up in the US, which based on physics and economics is simply an inevitable correction to a market inefficiency.

  2. Its inevitable that we burn the “oil” of supernovas past. Its energy that is too easy to release and too powerful to resist. The only question is where our technology will go. A question for the physicists to answer, as always. Subcritical fusion/fission hybrids? Molten-salt reactors? Thorium? Helium-cooled fast reactors? I’ll find out.

    1. It will be an interesting future to be sure. My take is that as technology progresses, the reactors will become more efficient and far safer. This will cause public acceptance of nuclear power to grow, ergo more consumption from more generators. But as efficiency grows, demand may taper. It may cause erratic growth in the U3O8 supply industry.

      1. Bingo, Steve. Efficiency is probably the direction the tech is headed, where reactors are so efficient that they operate on their own producing power for sixty years without so much as a refuel. I agree safety is improving – digital technology’s influence has been overwhelmingly in that direction.Take for instance the dramatic reduction in highway deaths even as crash rates remained constant. That was from just using CAD software and small amounts of driver-assist technologies like traction contorl. Reactors are quickly becoming nearly robotic, able to control their own states to such a degree that human-error is becoming increasingly impossible. They are starting to look more like lifeforms than machines.

        Remember to give the reactor operators credit, however. They have
        developed such an incredible “safety culture” that they would be better off not buying into healthcare.

          1. Currently fast-spectrum neutrons are increasingly utilized in new reactor designs, rather than just slow neutrons. These fast neutrons have a tendency to upconvert U238 to U239–>Np239–>Pu239, which fissions, whereas slow neutrons tend to just consume fuel rather than produce it. Thus the important trends in reactor “nuclear combustion” is the employment of neutrons to create more and more fuel inside the fuel during normal operation, extending refueling times to decades, and decreasing human labor. Thus reprocessing of spent fuel would be a continuous thing occurring inside the reactor, rather than something occurring outside the reactor at a different site.

            As for the fuel we have already used, currently sitting in water pools on-site at reactors across the world, its destination is the trash bin. A deep-geological disposal is very straightforward technically, but when non-technical people get involved in any process things get overly complicated (politics).

            Regardless, the nuclear renaissance starts the day a carbon-tax goes up in the US, which based on physics and economics is simply an inevitable correction to a market inefficiency.

    1. These days it seems like that feeling doesn’t only apply to uranium. But there’s definitely a lot of buzz going on these days, things are shaping up.

      But not to worry, the Leafs will win the cup…. someday…. I think.

      Cheers,
      Vivien

    1. These days it seems like that feeling doesn’t only apply to uranium. But there’s definitely a lot of buzz going on these days, things are shaping up.

      But not to worry, the Leafs will win the cup…. someday…. I think.

      Cheers,
      Vivien

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